Honduras Got it Right
The “military coup” in Honduras is an example of constitutional law working to remove an out of control executive.  The government of Honduras used legal means to make the change.  The people of the United States should take notes and act on them.  We have regular elections here too.
There has been a lot of news recently about international doings.  Iran had an election that is hotly disputed to the point of people demonstrating in the streets and videos showing the deaths of innocent passers by.  North Korea is launching missiles again.  Honduras had a “military coup”.  President Obama was strangely late to comment on the doings of Iran and North Korea and very quick to criticize the goings on in Honduras.  Why?
Unless President Obama tells us we cannot be sure.  Perhaps it is because the current president is following in the footsteps of the last several presidents and is clearly in favor of a more powerful executive.  One explanation is that President Obama is really speaking in favor of powerful executives instead of the rule of law.  A powerful executive in Iran is maintaining power in the face of a questionable election.  A powerful executive in North Korea is launching missiles and acting aggressively.  A powerful executive in Honduras is thrown out of office via legal and constitutional means.  That’s terrible!
Some background is in order.  President Manuel Zelaya was escorted from his home at the end of June by the military of Honduras.  Zelaya was in the process of seeking an extra-legal referendum to change the constitution to remove or extend Presidential term limits.  A referendum of this type would need the support of congress and there was no congressional support for this referendum.  Zelaya went so far as to secure ballots from Hugo Chavez for the election which ballots were then seized by the military of Honduras.  Zelaya would not stand for that and used an armed mob of people to take the ballots back.
The Supreme Court of Honduras previously ruled on the proposed referendum and the actions of Zelaya in continuing to force the election without the support of congress.  These actions were in violation of the Constitution of Honduras.  When the top General of the Honduran military refused to aid Zelaya in carrying out the referendum he was fired.  Zelaya was clearly seeking power using any means necessary.
Faced with an executive who refused to follow the law, the Supreme Court of Honduras issued an order to detain Zelaya which order was carried out by the military.  This military act was to preserve the integrity of the constitution and rule of law in Honduras.  Once Zelaya was removed from the country, a replacement was named by the congress from the same political party as Zelaya.  It was an orderly and minimally violent change of power in Honduras and the forms of government remained intact.  The regular November elections are scheduled to go forward as usual.
In spite of this turn of events and the orderly transfer of power from an out of control executive, Honduras is facing voluminous international criticism for these actions.  The real focus of criticism should be on Zelaya and his total disdain for the rule of law in his own country.
What about here in the United States?  We have an executive that is clearly pursuing actions in violation of the constitution and established law.  For example, the bankruptcy of Chrysler agreement violated more than 150 years of bankruptcy law by giving preferential treatment to other creditors before bond holders.  This was a violation of bankruptcy law, a possible “taking” under the Fifth Amendment, and a possible violation of other portions of the Constitution.  Why is congress sitting idly by?
Congress is enjoying the growth of governmental power too.  Each and every new regulation, area of regulation, and tax assessed against the people of the United States brings more power to the government.  The new laws and programs instituted by the President bring more power and money to the government of the United States.  Spending Billions and Trillions of dollars brings great power and influence.
When the people of Honduras were faced with an out of control President who had no regard for the laws of the land, the legal means to handle the situation were employed and the President was removed.  The people of the United States need to use the legal means at our disposal to remove out of control politicians and stand up for the rule of law instead of the rule of man.
Honduras did it right and we should follow their example.

Honduras Got it Right

The “military coup” in Honduras is an example of constitutional law working to remove an out of control executive.  The government of Honduras used legal means to make the change.  The people of the United States should take notes and act on them.  We have regular elections here too.

There has been a lot of news recently about international doings.  Iran had an election that is hotly disputed to the point of people demonstrating in the streets and videos showing the deaths of innocent passers by.  North Korea is launching missiles again.  Honduras had a “military coup”.  President Obama was strangely late to comment on the doings of Iran and North Korea and very quick to criticize the goings on in Honduras.  Why?

Unless President Obama tells us we cannot be sure.  Perhaps it is because the current president is following in the footsteps of the last several presidents and is clearly in favor of a more powerful executive.  One explanation is that President Obama is really speaking in favor of powerful executives instead of the rule of law.  A powerful executive in Iran is maintaining power in the face of a questionable election.  A powerful executive in North Korea is launching missiles and acting aggressively.  A powerful executive in Honduras is thrown out of office via legal and constitutional means.  That’s terrible!

Some background is in order.  President Manuel Zelaya was escorted from his home at the end of June by the military of Honduras.  Zelaya was in the process of seeking an extra-legal referendum to change the constitution to remove or extend Presidential term limits.  A referendum of this type would need the support of congress and there was no congressional support for this referendum.  Zelaya went so far as to secure ballots from Hugo Chavez for the election which ballots were then seized by the military of Honduras.  Zelaya would not stand for that and used an armed mob of people to take the ballots back.

The Supreme Court of Honduras previously ruled on the proposed referendum and the actions of Zelaya in continuing to force the election without the support of congress.  These actions were in violation of the Constitution of Honduras.  When the top General of the Honduran military refused to aid Zelaya in carrying out the referendum he was fired.  Zelaya was clearly seeking power using any means necessary.

Faced with an executive who refused to follow the law, the Supreme Court of Honduras issued an order to detain Zelaya which order was carried out by the military.  This military act was to preserve the integrity of the constitution and rule of law in Honduras.  Once Zelaya was removed from the country, a replacement was named by the congress from the same political party as Zelaya.  It was an orderly and minimally violent change of power in Honduras and the forms of government remained intact.  The regular November elections are scheduled to go forward as usual.

In spite of this turn of events and the orderly transfer of power from an out of control executive, Honduras is facing voluminous international criticism for these actions.  The real focus of criticism should be on Zelaya and his total disdain for the rule of law in his own country.

What about here in the United States?  We have an executive that is clearly pursuing actions in violation of the constitution and established law.  For example, the bankruptcy of Chrysler agreement violated more than 150 years of bankruptcy law by giving preferential treatment to other creditors before bond holders.  This was a violation of bankruptcy law, a possible “taking” under the Fifth Amendment, and a possible violation of other portions of the Constitution.  Why is congress sitting idly by?

Congress is enjoying the growth of governmental power too.  Each and every new regulation, area of regulation, and tax assessed against the people of the United States brings more power to the government.  The new laws and programs instituted by the President bring more power and money to the government of the United States.  Spending Billions and Trillions of dollars brings great power and influence.

When the people of Honduras were faced with an out of control President who had no regard for the laws of the land, the legal means to handle the situation were employed and the President was removed.  The people of the United States need to use the legal means at our disposal to remove out of control politicians and stand up for the rule of law instead of the rule of man.

Honduras did it right and we should follow their example.

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